[ˈsɛləˌdɔ:]

Laius hears a prophecy that his son will kill him and marry his wife. Fearing the prophecy, Laius pierces Oedipus' feet and leaves him out to die, but a herdsman finds him and takes him away from Thebes. Oedipus, not knowing he was adopted, leaves home in fear of the same prophecy that he would kill his father and marry his mother. Laius, meanwhile, ventures out to find a solution to the Sphinx's riddle. As prophesied, Oedipus crossed paths with Laius and this leads to a fight where Oedipus slays Laius. Oedipus then defeats the Sphinx by solving a mysterious riddle to become king. He marries the widow queen Jocasta not knowing she is his mother.

A man travels back in time to discover the cause of a famous fire. While in the building where the fire started, he accidentally knocks over a kerosene lantern and causes a fire, the same fire that would inspire him, years later, to travel back in time.
A man receives information about his own future, telling him that he will die from a heart attack. He resolves to get fit so as to avoid that fate, but in doing so overexerts himself, causing him to suffer the heart attack that kills him.

A final example is:

A man is hunting when someone shoots him. Surviving, he resolves to go back in time to stop the sniper. Appearing at the place of the incident, he sees someone approaching, he shoots them, believing that they are the sniper. Later, he realises that the man he shot was a past version of himself, and so he was both the sniper and the victim.

In all four examples, causality is turned on its head, as the flanking events are both causes and effects of each other, and this is where the paradox lies.

MA, VOI SIGUR NU MINTITI?

2 comentarii:

Anonim spunea...

Felicitari. Acum poti sa dai capacitatea.

saruzaru spunea...

http://www.paradoxes.co.uk/